Mapping for Change

Project

Citizen Science Used to Map Community Air Quality

Mapping for Change has supported many communities across London to measure and map local air quality. Use of a ‘citizen science’ approach has meant local residents in over 30 locations have been able to collect data, then see the real results of their monitoring activities. Subsequently, a number of communities have embarked on campaigns to see that their serious results are addressed.

Our Role

The citizen science approach offered by Mapping for Change provides communities with a way to measure air quality using low-technical methods, which means all sectors of the community feel able to participate. Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) was selected as the focus primarily because of the affordability of the monitoring equipment. In each location, a series of diffusion tubes are set out across the area to measure NO2 levels.  After a period of four weeks the diffusion tubes are collected and analysed, and the results mapped in each location.

Impact

Where this was carried out in Putney and Highbury the data indicated that levels along the main road networks were up to 75% above EU limits for the period. They also highlighted several residential back-roads used as ‘rat runs’. During the same period, another five locations across London were monitored; each comprised one of London’s Greenways (safe, quiet routes through parks, green spaces and lightly trafficked streets) with an adjacent busy road. The results showed significantly higher NO2 levels on the roads compared with the Greenways, despite their close proximity.

Results were fed back to the communities in well-attended meetings. The first was held in Highbury and was attended by over forty local residents, the Green Party London Mayoral candidate, the Local Authority and Clean Air London Director, Simon Birkett. GLA member Jenny Jones described the results as “terrifying”, but claimed the turnout had brought her hope as it demonstrated the issue was important for local people. A Public Protection Officer from the Local Authority who attended the meeting expressed her support for the study and highlighted the difficulties they have had in engaging the public in this discourse. She welcomed any move to raise awareness at the local level.

They came up with a list of measures which they and others in the community could adopt to reduce exposure to, and production of, harmful emissions.  They also listed a number of suggestions to be put forward to the Mayor and Local Authority.

In Putney, these results motivated TfL’s decision to use hybrid buses on the high street.

You can view the results of these citizen science activities on our online interactive Community Mapping platform. We have also developed a toolkit that will enable communities across the UK to engage in air quality monitoring activities.

Related Projects

Science in the City

Science in the City is a project that is being carried out with residents in the Barbican and Mansell Street, in the City of London. Residents are using low-tech tools to measure Nitrogen Dioxide and particulates.

UK Climate and Community Action Map

Mapping for Change produced a Climate and Community Action Map, to inform people about initiatives happening in their local area. As there are thousands of organisations and projects that could be displayed, there is no one organisation that has a comprehensive list so any mapping will need to rely on local people’s knowledge and readiness to add their work to the map.

Local Schools for Local Children

A group of parents from East Finchley were frustrated with the lack of good community secondary schools in their area and decided to unite and demand for a change. The group, Local Schools for Local Children, expanded, and has now more than 1,000 supportive local parents, who are campaigning for a new Free School – The Archer Academy.