Mapping for Change

Project

Clean Air Villages 3

Cross River Partnership is partnering with Lambeth Council for the Clean Air Villages 3 project to improve the air quality in 16 different London ‘villages’, where air pollution and population density levels are high. The project is being delivered on behalf of 16 partners, including 12 Local Authorities and 4 Business Improvement Districts across London.

During this year-long project, funded by the Defra Air Quality Grant,Cross River Partnership will engage with businesses, hospitals and wider communities to encourage behaviour change and support activities to reduce air pollution and congestion. Within the London Borough of Lambeth, Cross River Partnership is actively engaged with the Sustainability Committee from King’s College Hospital (KCH).

Our role

Mapping for Change is supporting the citizen science element of the project to help KCH develop a baseline understanding of their local air quality around the hospital grounds. We will be engaging hospital staff, through a citizen science approach, to increase awareness of air quality issues and encourage behaviour change towards reducing their impact on, and exposure to, harmful levels of pollution. Monitoring NO2 over a period of 6 months using diffusion tube sampling will also help inform decision making across the hospital.

Related Projects

Kampala NOSES; Network for Odour Sensing Empowerment and Sustainability.

Kampala NOSES is a pilot project that seeks to introduce novel ways with which to monitor and record odour issues across Kampala. All key stakeholders, from policy-makers to public sector administrators, from academics to industries and the community at large are needed to create a longer-term vision of implementing new environmental reporting and governance mechanisms. 

Citizen Science Used to Map Community Air Quality

In 2009, Mapping for Change supported communities across London to measure and map local air quality. Use of a ‘citizen science’ approach meant local residents in seven locations were able to collect data, then see the real results of their monitoring activities, and subsequently embark on a campaign to see the serious results addressed.